Lance Shaull — Medical School Student

Lance Shaull teaches students how to intubate in a medical emergency.

Lance Shaull, Covenant Award for Service Recipient, 2014-15 Academic Year


Lance Shaull '15, originally from Tea, South Dakota, majored in biology at Augustana. He received the Covenant Award for Service for the 2014-15 academic year.

Q. Tell us about your journey after graduating from Augustana  your career path (what are you doing now), family, education (graduate school), travel, etc.

A. After graduating, I spent a few months working in Boston on research projects with a Global Neurology group out of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). I switched teams after that, and worked with the Division of Global Health and Human Rights at MGH on emergency medicine research outside of Kisumu, Kenya. I worked and traveled around there for about nine months before starting at Rush Medical College in west Chicago where I am pursuing my medical degree. I've been here for about a year and a half and am absolutely loving it.

Q. Favorite class or favorite professor at Augustana, and why?

A. It's really tough to say, but I think my "Introduction to Evolutionary Developmental Biology" course with Dr. Matzner and Dr. Miles may have been my favorite. While many classes did this, I think this was one that really started to drastically shape the way that I viewed the world. Dr. Miles and Dr. Matzner were also so excited to be teaching the course that it became contagious.

Q. What were you involved in that prepared you for the present and future?

A. My involvement in extra-curricular groups like Biology Club, Serving and Learning Together (SALT), and being an admissions ambassador were things that prepared me for the real world. Learning how to organize groups of people, how to lead, and how to know when to follow were all skills that I thought I had until I had to put them to work. It was at Augie where I really started to do that and to learn leadership by practicing it.

Q. If you could offer an Augustana student some advice, what would you say?

A. I think that it's so important for people to simply do what they're passionate about. It's so easy to get caught up in what people want you to do (or what you think they want you to do), to just keep putting one foot in front of the other, and to never stop and think about what gets you out of bed in the morning. If you're passionate enough about anything, you'll eventually be good at it. If you're good enough at anything, someone will pay you to do it.