academics

Classics

Associate Professor: R. Wentzel

The study of the ancient Mediterranean world, especially that of the Greeks and Romans, takes us back to the beginnings of our Western civilization. Although the prime concern is with the way the ancient Greeks and Romans lived and thought, the lines of influence extend to our own lives as well. Religious thought, legal codes, drama, lyric poetry, the writing of history, all took shape in these cultures of the Mediterranean. At this time a general survey of the cultural movements of the Mediterranean world is offered with the support of the History department and a survey of classical literature is offered within the purview of comparative literature. The Philosophy department offers a survey of the ancient philosophical schools of thought. Additional courses in the classics are offered during the Interim.

A Classics major and three minors (Ancient Languages, Classical Philology and Classical Studies) are available. Language courses offered beyond the beginning level are available as independent studies. Some electives are offered as topics courses. Greek is taught with attention to both the biblical and classical context and satisfies seminary prerequisites in the language. Latin still functions as a valuable adjunct for work in history, religion (the early Lutheran heritage was crafted in German and Latin), English, law and medicine. Students interested in pursuing graduate studies in Classics are urged to take additional courses in both languages and additional electives.

Classics Major:

30 credit hours
CLAS 200 & 201— Elementary Greek I and II (3 cr, 3 cr)
CLAS 202 — Intermediate Greek III (3 cr)
CLAS 205 & 206 — Elementary Latin I and II (3 cr, 3 cr)
CLAS 207 — Intermediate Latin III (3 cr)
CLAS 399 — Advanced Greek Reading IV (3 cr)
CLAS 399 — Advanced Latin Reading IV (3 cr)
CLAS — Non-language electives (6 cr)

Ancient Languages Minor:

15 credit hours
The minor may be fulfilled with at least two continuous semesters of one language, or five semesters of the same language. Ancient language courses such as Sanskrit, Arabic, Egyptian Heiroglyphics, and Akkadian Cuneiform studied at other institutions will be considered and permitted at the discretion of the program director.

Take 15 credit hours from:
CLAS 200 & 201 — Elementary Greek I and II (3 cr, 3 cr)
CLAS 202 — Intermediate Greek III (3 cr)
CLAS 205 & 206 — Elementary Latin I and II (3 cr, 3 cr)
CLAS 207 — Intermediate Latin III (3 cr)
CLAS 399 — Advanced Greek Reading IV (3 cr)
CLAS 399 — Advanced Latin Reading IV (3 cr)
RELI 101 & 102 — Beginning Hebrew I and II (3 cr, 3 cr)
RELI 197 — Hebrew Readings (3 cr)

Classical Philology Minor:

15 credit hours
CLAS 200 & 201 — Elementary Greek I and II (3 cr, 3 cr)
CLAS 205 & 206 — Elementary Latin I and II (3 cr, 3 cr)
CLAS — Elective course (3 cr)

Classical Studies Minor:

15 credit hours
CLAS 200 & 201 — Elementary Greek I and II (3 cr, 3 cr)
–or– CLAS 205 & 206 — Elementary Latin I and II (3 cr, 3 cr)
CLAS Elective courses (9 cr)

Classics Courses:

CLAS 101 — Beginning Hebrew I (Area 3.4) (3 credits)
Students will improve their general reading knowledge of Biblical Hebrew with a more detailed study of Hebrew grammar, the further development of basic Hebrew vocabulary, and an introduction to the syntax of Hebrew prose. Course also introduces students to a number of textual matters pertaining to the critical study of the Hebrew Bible. Cross listed with RELI 101. Offered Most Fall Semesters.

CLAS 102 — Beginning Hebrew II (Area 3.4) (3 credits)
This course introduces the Hebrew alphabet, vocabulary, and grammar in a systematic manner using textbook and workbook assignments, text readings from the Hebrew Bible and weekly quizzes. Students will gain the skills necessary for reading and translating the Hebrew Bible and begin to develop exegetical competence. Cross listed with RELI 102. Prerequisite: CLAS 101; Offered Most Spring Semesters.

CLAS 200 — Elementary Greek I (Area 3.4) (3 credits)
Introduction to ancient Greek, both Biblical and classical. This course places heavy emphasis on learning the forms of Greek and developing basic vocabulary. Offered Every Fall Semester.

CLAS 201 — Elementary Greek II (Area 3.4) (3 credits)
Introduction to ancient Greek, both Biblical and classical. This course stresses syntax and development of reading skills.  Prerequisite: CLAS 200; Offered Every Spring Semester.

CLAS 202 — Intermediate Greek III (Area 3.4) (3 credits)
This course is a continuation of the fundamentals of Greek grammar, including mi verbs, indirect constructions, other subordinate constructions, comparative and superlative adjectives, pronouns, and many irregular verbs. The emphasis will be on the recognition and translation of grammatical structures. Prerequisite: CLAS 201; Offered Every Fall Semester.

CLAS 205 — Elementary Latin I (Area 3.4) (3 credits)
Introduction to the Latin language, including study of forms, syntax, vocabulary, and relationship to English.  Offered Every Fall Semester.

CLAS 206 — Elementary Latin II (Area 3.4) (3 credits)
Introduction to the Latin language, including study of forms, syntax, vocabulary, and relationship to English.  Prerequisite: CLAS 205; Offered Every Spring Semester.

CLAS 207 — Intermediate Latin III (3 credits)
This course is a continuation of the fundamentals of Latin grammar, including participles, gerunds and gerundive constructions, indirect statement , and all subjunctive constructions. Prerequisite: CLAS 206

CLAS 220 — Our Philosophical Heritage I (Area 3.1A) (3 credits)
A survey of the history of Western philosophy from the pre-Socratics through the scholastics, concentrating upon the main thinkers, ideas, and cultural developments of the period. Cross-Listed with CLAS 220; Offered Every Fall Semester.

CLAS 230 — Classical Mythology (Area 3.5A) (3 credits)
This course is a survey of the mythology of ancient Greece and Rome through primary texts, including epic, tragedy, and history. Topics to be examined include conception of the gods, depictions of the relationship between mortals and immortals and the boundaries that define them, heroism, gender, and the historical and cultural contexts from which this mythology emerged. Works to be read will span from the archaic period in Greece to the Golden Age of Rome. Offered Every Fall Semester.

CLAS 301 — New Testament Greek I (3 credits)
Selected readings from the Gospels, with a review of grammar and syntax. Prerequisite: CLAS 201; Offered as Independent Scholarship.

CLAS 302 — New Testament Greek II (3 credits)
Selected readings from the Letters, with a review of grammar and syntax.  Prerequisite: CLAS 201; Offered as Independent Scholarship.

CLAS 311 — Readings in Plato and Aristotle (3 credits)
An introduction to the writings of Plato and Aristotle in the original Greek. A dialogue of Plato and representative selections of Aristotle’s thought are read, with emphasis on content and style of expression.
Cross-Listed with PHIL 311; Recommended Prerequisite: CLAS 220; Offered Occasionally.

CLAS 312 — Greek Drama (3 credits)
An introduction to Greek drama. Plays by the major tragedians, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and the comic playwright, Aristophanes are read. History of drama and poetics will also be studied. In addition to reading, projects in performance, staging, and set design will be assigned. Recommended Prerequisite ENGL 225; Cross-Listed With THEA 312; Offered Occasionally.

CLAS 197, 297, 397 — Topics (2-4 credits)

CLAS 199, 299, 399 — Independent Study (2-4 credits)