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Course Descriptions and Requirements

The Sign Language Interpreting Program prepares students to interpret in a variety of settings. The program has been developed in accordance with the Conference of Interpreter Trainers (CIT) recommended course of study and is based on a broad foundation of liberal arts, sciences, professional education, research, and practicum. Students must pass the Intermediate level of the SLPI (Sign Language Proficiency Interview) and a Spoken English Assessment to be admitted into the Sign Language Interpreting Program.

Sign Language Interpreting Major:

41 credit hours
Required Courses:

ASL 101— Foundations in Deafness (3 cr)
ASL 110 — American Sign Language I (3 cr)
ASL 111 — American Sign Language II (3 cr)
ASL 210 — American Sign Language III (3 cr)
ASL 211 — American Sign Language IV (3 cr)
INTR 201 — Introduction to Interpreting (2 cr)
INTR 301 — Building Translation Skills (3 cr)
INTR 334 — American Sign Language V (3 cr)
INTR 340 — Interpretation I (3 cr)
INTR 342 — American Sign Language to English I (3 cr)
INTR 343 — English to American Sign Language I (3 cr)
INTR 344 — American Sign Language to English II (3 cr)
INTR 345 — English to American Sign Language II (3 cr)
INTR 360 — ASL Linguistics and Sociolinguistics (3 cr)

Courses Required for Certification: 15 credit hours
INTR 350 — Specialized Interpreting (3 cr)
INTR 355 — Interpreting Practicum (3 cr)
INTR 455 —Advanced Interpreting Practicum (9 cr)

Supportive Courses Required for Certification: 19 credit hours
COMM 110 — Introduction to Communication (3 cr)
EDUC 355 — Human Relations in Education (3 cr)
–or–GOVT 120 — Politics in a Diverse World
–or– PSYC 335 — Human Relations
ENGL 110 — First-Year Composition (4 cr)
GOVT 110 — Introduction to Government (3 cr)
NAST — Elective Course (NAST 320 or 352) (3 cr)
THEA 115 — The Theatre Experience (3 cr)
–or–*THEA 121 — Acting I
–or– THEA 220 — Acting II
*Note: THEA 121 does not satisfy general education requirements.

Sign Language Interpreting Courses:

INTR 201 — Introduction to Interpreting (2 credits)
This course provides a survey of the field of ASL/English interpreting including roles and responsibilities, professional practices, and certificate/licensure. An introduction to the ethical practices of the interpreting profession, interpreting process models, and Demand/Control theory will be included. Prerequisites: ASL 110 & EDHH 220; Offered Every Fall Semester.

INTR 232 — An Exploration of Organizations & Institutions Serving Deaf Individuals (1 credit)
Washington DC is a hub of Deaf culture; the home to many facilities and agencies that focus on Deaf services and education. Deaf people from all over the country move to Washington DC to work, learn, and live where there is a plethora of opportunity. We will travel to Washington DC to visit Gallaudet University, the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School, the Model Secondary School for the Deaf, the National Association of the Deaf headquarters, and the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf headquarters, as well as many national monuments and museums. At each location, we will explore the history and development of the organization. This course focuses on the study of the field of interpreting for and educating Deaf individuals, the history of the profession, and Deaf culture from an historical perspective. Students will have an opportunity to experience being a linguistic minority at Gallaudet University and navigate a large metropolitan area from the perspective of a Deaf individual. This course is geared towards Education of the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing majors as well as Sign Language Interpreting majors wishing to garner a better understanding of Deaf culture and the institutions serving those individuals. Prerequisites: EDHH 220 & ASL 110. Corequisite: ASL 111.

Prerequisite for INTR 300 and 400-level Courses: Admission to Interpreting Program

INTR 301 — Building Translation Skills (3 credits)
This course provides students with an introduction to cognitive processing, theory of translation, and models of interpretation. Students will engage in a variety of lab activities designed to isolate various cognitive processes in order to increase student’s ability to focus, concentrate, and analyze. Components of translation will be discussed and practiced in both English and ASL. Students will learn various models of interpretation and their application to prepare them for Interpretation I. Prerequisites: ASL 210 and INTR 201; Offered Every Spring Semester.

INTR 334 — American Sign Language V (3 credits)

This course is a continuation of the ASL classes taken previously, where students build their expertise in the visual-kinetic language used by Deaf people in the US and Canada. ASL V students will learn the difference between Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills and Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency This course will cover common communication situations such as making major decisions and storytelling. ASL V students will also learn the basic concepts of linguistics as they pertain to ASL structure. ASL Expansion and English Compression strategies will be introduced. Communication functions, vocabulary, grammar and cultural aspects of the Deaf community will be covered throughout the course.  Prerequisites: EDHH 220 & ASL 211; Offered Every Fall Semester.

INTR 340 — Interpretation I (Area 2.1B) (3 credits)

This course focuses on research into the current practices of ASL/English interpretation. We will also work on consecutive interpretation theory and practice. Interpretation skills from ASL to spoken English and from spoken English to ASL will be a key component in this course. Expansion/Compression strategies and interpreting management strategies will also be introduced. Prerequisites: INTR 301; Offered Every Fall Semester.

INTR 342 — American Sign Language to English I (3 credits)

This course is designed to expose students to a variety of settings in which an interpreter may function.  The Demand-Control theory will be the foundational approach to setting analysis including the principles and protocols associated with each setting “Hands-on” experiences will be provided through various mock situations for the purpose of demonstrating appropriate placement and skill application in each of these settings.  This course includes both observations, lecture, and in class discussions. Prerequisites: INTR 340; Offered Every Spring Semester.

INTR 343 — English to American Sign Language I (3 credits)

This course is designed to expose students to a variety of settings in which an interpreter may function.  The Demand-Control theory will be the foundational approach to setting analysis including the principles and protocols associated with each setting “Hands-on” experiences will be provided through various mock situations for the purpose of demonstrating appropriate placement and skill application in each of these settings.  This course includes both observations, lecture, and in class discussions. Prerequisites: INTR 342; Offered Every Spring Semester.

INTR 344 — American Sign Language to English II (3 credits)

This course is designed to expose students to a variety of settings in which an interpreter may function using ASL to English skills.  The Demand-Control theory will be the foundational approach to setting analysis including the principles and protocols associated with each setting “Hands-on” experiences will be provided through various mock situations for the purpose of demonstrating appropriate placement and skill application in each of these settings.  This course includes both observations, lecture, and in class discussions.  Prerequisites: INTR 342; Offered Every Fall Semester.

INTR 345 — English to American Sign Language II (3 credits)

This course is designed to expose students to a variety of settings in which an interpreter may function using English to ASL skills.  The Demand-Control theory will be the foundational approach to setting analysis including the principles and protocols associated with each setting “Hands-on” experiences will be provided through various mock situations for the purpose of demonstrating appropriate placement and skill application in each of these settings.  This course includes both observations, lecture, and in class discussions. Prerequisites: INTR 343; Offered Every Fall Semester.

INTR 350 — Specialized Interpreting (3 credits)
This course focuses on advanced interpretation skills. This course will address students’ ability to modify their interpretation based on consumer preferences and linguistic needs. The main focus of this course is to introduce students to various populations of Deaf consumers and their individual requests. This course includes both observations and in-class discussions. Prerequisites: INTR 340; Offered Every Other Interim.

INTR 355 — Interpreting Practicum (3 credits)

This course provides the advanced-level interpreting student with opportunities to observe and experience the interpreting process in various occupational settings.  Students are expected to spend a minimum of one week at the host agency, organization or institution observing host interpreters. Classroom work includes a discussion forum of a decision-making model that guides students in ethical decision-making. Practicum students will meet together online to discuss the interpreting process. Students will begin to build their online presence during this course as well. Prerequisites: INTR 343; Offered Every Spring Semester.

INTR 360 — ASL Linguistics and Sociolinguistics (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to the linguistics study of American Sign Language, including phonology, morphology, syntax, and the basics of sociolinguistics. The discussion addresses the major features of languages and the structure, use, and variation in American Sign Language. Prerequisites: INTR 334 & 340; Offered Every Other Interim.

INTR 455 — Advanced Interpreting Practicum (9 credits)

Advanced Interpreting Practicum provides students with extensive exploration of the interpreting profession under the guidance of a qualified, professional interpreter in settings that may include one or several of the following: education, medical, business, and government. The experience will be ten to fourteen weeks in length, requiring approximately 40 hours per week. Prerequisites: EDHH 220, INTR 344, 345, 350, and 355; Offered Every Spring Semester.

INTR 197, 297, 397 — Topics in Sign Language Interpreting (1-4 credits)

INTR 199, 299, 399 — Independent Study (1-4 credit)