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Computer Science Dept.
2001 S. Summit Ave
Sioux Falls, SD 57197
605-274-4711
1-800-727-2844

 

Majors

Computer Science

Computer Information Systems (CIS)


Courses

Department Course List


Overview

The underlying goal of the Department of Computer Science is to provide up-to-date, quality instruction in its undergraduate programs to support careers in business, science, government, and industry, and to furnish a strong foundation for graduate study in computer science. In support of these goals, a curriculum has been developed which: a) provides coherent, broad-based coverage of the computing discipline; b) prepares students to apply their knowledge to solving constrained problems, which includes the ability to define a problem clearly, to specify, design, implement, test, modify, document solutions, and to work within a team environment throughout the problem solving process; c) provides sufficient exposure to the rich body of theory that underlies the field of computing; and d) provides an environment in which students are exposed to the ethical and social issues associated with the computing field.

The computer science department offers a major in Computer Science, a major in Computer Information Systems (CIS), a minor in Computer Science, and a minor in CIS. The Computer Science major provides the strongest mathematical and scientific background. It is recommended for students who intend to pursue graduate studies or to seek employment involving the technical or scientific application of computing. The CIS major deals more with the business and human aspects of computing. It has fewer requirements relating to science and mathematics, but has additional requirements for courses in business administration. The CIS degree program is recommended for students who intend to seek employment involving user-interfacing and business application of computing. A minor in Computer Science and a minor in CIS are available to students who choose to concentrate their studies in an affiliated area.

Computer Science

Courses are included in the curriculum to support the general department goals and the detailed program goals. In addition, several courses are offered to provide the necessary basic knowledge of computer technology and computer programming for those students wishing to use the computer as a tool for study and research in other disciplines.

Major: 44-45 credit hours including Computer Science 210, 211, 235, 236, 250, 260, 330, 350, Mathematics 251, 321, 362 or Business Administration 270; 8 c.h. of electives from Computer Science courses numbered 200 and above but no more than 4 c.h. can be taken from 221, 225, 341, 342.

Minor: 18 credit hours including Computer Science 210, 211, 235; 6 c.h. of electives from Computer Science courses numbered 200 or above but no more than 3 c.h. can be taken from 221, 225, 341, 342.

Computer Information Systems

M. Entwistle, Coordinator

The Computer Information Systems (CIS) major is designed to incorporate the tools and techniques of management with advanced computer technology. The goal of this program is to enable students to analyze, design, implement, evaluate, control, and manage computer-based information systems for businesses, government, and other organizations. The major is designed to prepare students for positions as CIS consultants, management services advisors, systems analysts and designers, programming managers, managers of information services and data processing departments, and other similar positions.

Augustana’s CIS major has been designed to follow the underlying philosophy of the model curricula that have been constructed by the professional associations Association for Computing Machinery and Data Processing Management Association.

Major: 44 credit hours including Computer Science 210, 211, 215, 221, 250, 341, 342, Accounting 210, Business Administration 320; 310 or 330, Economics 120, 270, and 4 hours of computer science electives numbered 200 and above. For students considering careers in software development, Computer Science 235 and 260 are strongly recommended.

Minor: A minimum of 18 credit hours including Computer Science 210, 215, 341, Business Administration 320.

Courses

100-103 are designed to introduce students to popular computer application software through hands-on laboratory exercises. Each provides an introduction to the effective use of computers for students in all majors. 110 combines instruction in all of those areas in one 3-credit-hour course. Therefore, students may not take both 110 and 100 or 101 or 102 or 103.

100. WORD PROCESSING/PRESENTATION SOFTWARE. 1 Cr. Hr.

101. SPREADSHEET APPLICATION SOFTWARE. 1 Cr. Hr.

102. DATABASE APPLICATION SOFTWARE. 1 Cr. Hr.

103. PRESENTATION SOFTWARE. 1 Cr. Hr.

110. COMPUTERS AND APPLICATIONS. 3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed to give students basic knowledge of the computer and to introduce them to some of the more common applications of the computer. Topics include concepts of computer hardware and software, the information processing cycle, computer communications, and the impact of technology on society. Introduction to Windows, email, World Wide Web, and computer applications such as word processing, spreadsheets, and database management are provided in hands-on laboratory experiences. No prerequisites.

120. INTERNET & WWW. 1 Cr. Hr.

This course teaches the necessary skills to use the Internet for research and information needs. Topics include WWW browsers, electronic mail, gopher, FTP, Archie, and Web Page creation. Legal and ethical issues in cyberspace will also be discussed. The course will use an exercise-oriented approach, to allow students to learn by example and to encourage curiosity and exploration of Internet resources. Prerequisites: Computer Science 110 or permission of instructor.

170. VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING. 2 Cr. Hrs.

This exploratory course is designed to give students basic knowledge of developing programs. Some of the topics covered will include: introductory programming concepts, selection, iteration procedures, and steps in program development. Intended for students with little or no previous programming experience.

210. COMPUTER SCIENCE I. 4 Cr. Hrs.

An introduction to computer science, which include topics such as software engineering, computer architecture, and programming languages. Emphasis on learning the styles, techniques, and methodologies necessary to design and develop readable and efficient programs. No prerequisites.

211. COMPUTER SCIENCE II. 4 Cr. Hrs.

A broadening of foundations for computer science with advanced concepts in software engineering and program development. Topics include an introduction to data structures, analysis of algorithms, and object-oriented design. Prerequisites: Computer Science 210.

215. FUNDAMENTALS OF DATABASE PROCESSING. 3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will acquaint students with applications and the logical structure of database management systems and database processing. Discussion of database systems and design of special projects utilizing different query and other high-level programming languages reinforces the theoretical concepts. Prerequisites: Computer Science 210. Recommended: Computer Science 211.

221. COBOL AND BUSINESS DATA PROCESSING. 3 Cr. Hrs.

This course stresses application of computer software to management and commercial areas using COBOL as the primary programming language. Applications will be to particular problems in business and management. Topics includes sequential, indexed sequential and relative file processing techniques within a business environment. The structured design and implementation of the programming projects utilize file creation, editing and updating concepts. Prerequisites: Computer Science 210.

225. PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES. 1-3 Cr. Hrs.

Programming in a modern high-level language for students who are already proficient in another programming language. Course may be repeated for different languages. Prerequisites: Computer Science 211.

226. JAVA PROGRAMMING 3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides an overview of the Java programming language. Concepts include complete Java classes, inheritance techniques, and using Java to create applets. Prerequisite: COSC 211

235. COMPUTER ORGANIZATION. 4 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the organization and architecture of digital computer systems. Topics include number systems, binary arithmetic, Boolean algebra, combinatorial and sequential logic circuits, and computer system components and their interrelationships. This course consists of both a lecture and a lab portion of hands-on hardware manipulation. Prerequisites: Computer Science 211.

236. COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE. 3 Cr. Hrs.

This course offers an introduction to machine- and assembly-language programming and how they relate to computer architecture. Students will be provided with an understanding of what the computer is doing at the machine language level. This understanding will enable a better understanding of the features and limitations of all computer facilities, since all systems eventually rest on their underlying hardware. Prerequisites: Computer Science 235.

250. (W) SOCIAL, LEGAL, AND ETHICAL ISSUES. 2 Cr. Hrs.

The purpose of this course is to help students reflect upon the vexing ethical dilemmas and problems emerging in the information age. Legal issues involving current computer law will be discussed. Students are required to research a current topic in information ethics and present their findings to the class. Prerequisites: Computer Science 110 or 210 or consent of instructor.

260. DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS. 3 Cr. Hrs.

This course investigates various representations for several advanced data structures as well as compares and analyzes various algorithms for manipulating such data structures. Data structures examined include stack, queue, list, tree, and graph. Algorithms for sorting, searching, and memory management will also be examined. Prerequisites: Computer Science 211.

270. NETWORK ADMINISTRATION. 3 Cr. Hrs.

Network administration is one of the fastest growing fields in information technology. This course is designed to provide you with a thorough grounding in various networking systems, including hands-on activities in installation, configuration, and administration of local area networks. Prerequisite: COSC 236

280. HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION. 3 Cr. Hrs.

Human-computer Interaction (HCI) is the study of people, computer technology and the ways these influence each other. This course will discuss human cognitive and physical capabilities and how to incorporate this knowledge into the design of technology. General areas covered in the course include interface design, interface evaluation and the integration of HCI into design practice. Prerequisite: COSC 210

310. OPERATING SYSTEMS. 3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides the student with an introduction to fundamental operating systems concepts. Topics include the process model of computation and concurrent processes, inter-process communication and synchronization, process scheduling, deadlock, memory management, paging and segmentation, and file systems. Prerequisites: Computer Science 236, 260.

320. COMPUTER GRAPHICS. 3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of interactive computer graphics. Topics include graphics hardware, fundamental algorithms, two-and three-dimensional imaging geometry and transformations, curve and surface design, rendering, shading, color, and animation. Prerequisites: Computer Science 236, 260.

330. THEORY OF COMPUTATION. 3 Cr. Hrs.

This course offers an introduction to the foundations of computing. Topics include different models of computation such as finite automata, push-down automata, Turing Machines, and regular expressions; grammars and parsing techniques; solvable and unsolvable problems; and P and NP complexity classes. Prerequisites: Computer Science 236, 260, Mathematics 321.

341. INFORMATION SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN. 3 Cr. Hrs.

This course discusses the analysis and design techniques to define information requirements and to construct models of the information system. Procedures to define the program specifications, to develop procedures and documentation, and to plan implementation are also examined. The course includes the study and practice of design and analysis tools.

342.(W) INFORMATION SYSTEMS PRACTICUM. 2 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides students with a hands-on experience in applying concepts of technical design, test specifications and planning, programming and testing, user training, system testing, file conversion, and system installation. Students will work with local business professionals in designing and implementing an information system for their business or organization. Prerequisites: Computer Science 215 and 341.

350. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING. 3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed to teach the full-fledged software development cycle, with a team project utilizing CASE tools. Topics include testing and validation, metrics and complexity, software reliability and fault tolerance. Prerequisites: Computer Science 236, 260.

360. COMPUTER NETWORKS. 3 Cr. Hrs.

The objective of this course is to teach the student the basic principles involved in the design and operation of computer networks. Topics include computer network architectures and models, physical media and signaling, data link protocols, medium access control, routing and IP, transport services including TCP/UDP, network applications, local-area and wide-area networks. The course will consist of both a lecture portion and a hands-on laboratory. Prerequisites: Computer Science 236, 260.

370. PARALLEL PROCESSING. 3 Cr. Hrs.

The course introduces students to the history of parallel computing and the most recent developments and trends. The course covers architectures, systems software, languages and user-level software, and performance evaluation. Topics include speedup and scalability, MIMD architectures, SIMD architectures, shared-memory multi-processors, interconnection networks, data flow architectures, workstation clusters, synchronization and communication, memory and address space management, cache coherence, process management and scheduling, parallel languages and compiler techniques, parallel programming environments and tools. Prerequisites: Computer Science 236, 260.

372. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (MATH 372). 3 Cr. Hrs.

This course discusses the theory and applications of numerical methods with computer implementation. Topics include solutions of nonlinear equations and systems of equations, interpolation and approximation, differential equations, error bounds and stability. Prerequisites: Computer Science 210, Mathematics 253.

380. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND ROBOTICS. 4 Cr. Hrs.

This course introduces the student to various aspects of artificial intelligence (AI), whose goals are the creation of more useful machines by making them more “intelligent.” Topics include symbolic programming, representation and logic, search, learning, planning, uncertainty, image processing, natural language processing, genetic algorithms. Techniques learned are applied in a robotics laboratory to the control and manipulation of a mobile robot. Prerequisites: Computer Science 236, 260.

395. INTERNSHIP. 2-4 Cr. Hrs.

197, 297, 397. TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE. 2-4 Cr. Hrs.

199, 299, 399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 2-4 Cr. Hrs.

© 2002 Augustana College
Augustana College
2001 S. Summit Ave.
Sioux Falls, SD, 57197

For comments/questions contact: Marcia_Entwistle@augie.edu



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