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Biology Faculty and Students Have Research Published

SIOUX FALLS - The Biology Department is having a banner year in 2008 when it comes to publications.

Many of the published papers have been co-authored by Augustana students. In addition, there are several collaborators from other institutions.

Papers accepted for publication or already published include the following:

Mike Wanous, Eric Storlie (INBRE postdoc), and 13 students have a paper in Theoretical and Applied Genetics on gene expression of the HMW glutenins in wheat. This is a culmination of five years of work.

Mark Larson, Bill Harris (Sanford School of Medicine), and three students have a paper in Thrombosis and Haemostasis on the effects of omega-3 fatty acids and aspirin on platelet function in healthy subjects, a culmination of two years of work.

Paul Egland and Kristi Egland (Sanford School of Medicine) have a paper in Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics on HER-2 gene amplification in breast cancers of Native American women.

Maureen Diggins, John Brannian, and Kathleen Eyster (both of Sanford School of Medicine) and one student have a paper in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology on how pioglitizone alters ovarian gene expression in aging obese lethal yellow mice.

Craig Spencer, Steve Matzner, and Mike Chapman along with three students have a paper in American Midland Naturalist on forest expansion and soil carbon changes in the loess hills of eastern South Dakota.

Steve Matzner and David Siemens (Black Hills State University) have a paper in Oikos on the evolution of drought tolerance and plant defenses.

Amy Lewis and Ken Higgins (South Dakota State University) have a paper in Prairie Naturalist on landscape characteristics and bird species occurrence in sage brush habitats in North and South Dakota.

Paul Egland and Kristi Egland (Sanford School of Medicine) and five students have a paper in revision for the Journal of Bacteriology on requirements for interspecies signaling in oral bacterial biofilms. This paper is a culmination of four years of work.

Mike Wanous, Isabelle Colas, Graham Moore, and other researchers from the John Innes Centre in Norwich England have a paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on how effective chromosome pairing requires chromatin remodeling at the beginning of meiosis. This is the second paper published as the result of Wanous’ sabbatical leave in England.