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Dakota Pianist Concert to Feature Works by Mozart, Soler, Beethoven

SIOUX FALLS — Augustana College will present “Dakota Pianist,” featuring internationally known pianist Eugene Gienger, at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 3, in Kresge Recital Hall. The concert will feature solo piano works by Mozart, Soler, Beethoven, Brahms, and Ravel. The event is free and open to the general public.

Dakota Pianist is the stage name for Eugene Gienger, the only classical pianist from the Dakotas to have achieved an international reputation as a performer and master teacher.

Now residing in South Dakota after an absence of 39 years, Gienger presents solo recitals and concertos with orchestras, with spoken program notes and insights aimed at furthering appreciation and understanding by those who may not normally listen to classical music.

Since accepting a piano position in Australia in 1978, DAKOTA PIANIST has lectured in piano at both The University of Queensland (with tenure), and later in 1997 and following years at the Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University in Brisbane.

Gienger is renowned as a teacher, however, in working with gifted young children in an independent practice in Toowoomba, Queensland, where he developed a unique method of teaching piano technique and ear-training to the very young. His teaching activities have produced first prize-winners of many local, state, national and international piano competitions, as well a producing important piano teachers in Australia, the United States, England, Taiwan and Germany.

His large repertoire spans all styles and periods and includes several dozen piano concerti. He has performed widely in the USA and Australia, and also in Canada and Russia. DAKOTA PIANIST holds honors degrees in piano performance from the University of Minnesota and Indiana University, where he was named personal teaching assistant to Menahem Pressler of the world-renowned Beaux-Arts Trio. His recordings include “Virtuoso Praise” on the Salt of the Earth label, “Home Recital I,” “Bach to Penberthy,” and “A Bit of Bach and Lots of Liszt” (with “Even More Liszt”).